Job security.

When a dreadful project that nobody will touch comes across your desk, snatch it right up.

Dig in deep, untangle the knots and understand every nuance.

Become the person that does this time and time again.

And in no time you’ll be indispensable.

 

 

The weeds.

The weeds.

Weed emerging through cement

“You must be in the medical field,” My doctor said as he flipped through my indexed and cross-referenced binder of medical tests.

“No, since we only have 15 minutes…  

I just wanted you focused on my problem, not shuffling through a disarray of papers and lab work.”

Being strategic often means diving into the details and nuances of a project.  

In fact, understanding the nuances and “weeds” is an important step I like to take before ever delegating anything to someone else.  This way, I can coach them from experience, and I can’t be BS’ed about how long something takes or how hard it is.

God is in the details.

And the details are in the weeds.

 

Another HT to Seth Godin for getting me to ponder “caring” and “trying” in general.

 

 

 

 

Someone there.

Someone there.

Isn’t it nice when technical support stays on the phone with you longer than they have to? Just to be sure you’ve 100% “got it.” My husband and I work together, and often when I’m unsure or apprehensive about something I’m working on, he will silently take a seat next to me, often with his arm on my back. It’s just so comforting to have someone there.

Better than before.

The book Better Than Before by Gretchen Rubin is life-changing.  After all, that’s all we can ever hope for – to be better than we were yesterday.

This week I struggled for hours with a nonsensical technology problem (I couldn’t get Microsoft Word to download onto my new PC!).

Now that I’ve fixed the problem, I can leverage my newly acquired information throughout my small business, so nobody else wastes their time on the same issue.

What if we looked at all problems as a way to bypass a future struggle?   A way to  become “better than before?”

Stated in this positive way, problems, mistakes, and issues would likely become a more welcome part of our days.

Initiative.

We all know it’s not your job to replace the lightbulb in the office refrigerator. But imagine becoming known as the “summer intern who changed the bulb?”

Anyone can wait for direction from a supervisor.

What’s in short supply are folks who notice an issue and make it better without being asked.