What is normal?

An expert is someone that can explain to you what “normal” is.

Something that is scary or outrageous to a novice, is usually old-hat to an expert.

For example:

A grandma can help a new mom discern between a normal cry and one that suggests illness.

A boss can help their staff understand normal corporate red tape, and shortcuts to circumventing it.

An older brother can help a younger one recognize what normal growing pains feel like, (“Phew, you felt this way too?”).

When I find out that what’s upsetting me is actually “normal,” I usually stop fretting immediately.

Wouldn’t it be great:

-if experts could think back and share their rookie experiences with newbies?

-if we all felt braver about requesting input from people we consider pros, instead of being afraid of seeming inept?

Imagine how much faster we’d all get to where we are going!

 

 

 

 

 

 

The kids are all right.

This Christmas, I caught up with many of my 20-something relatives.

C & J are newly-married business owners, and already understand how to navigate the potential typhoon of working together.  C is the steady force.  And J takes the risks.

My nephew and his fiancée are doing the hard work of deciding their division of labor before they tie the knot.  Turns out he loves grocery shopping and she doesn’t mind doing laundry.

K aspires to a career in law – and while she’s always been incredibly articulate, she now possesses a strength that will certainly benefit her future Clients.

M is a college freshman and was eager to tell me about his roommate.  R just graduated from college and is making sure he gets a great job before committing to his own place.

I told A some issues I was having at work, and she shared her insights that I’ll put right into practice on Monday.

What can you learn from listening to the young people around you?

Turns out, quite a lot.

 

 

 

Secret rules.

I’m convinced that there are secret rules everyone knows but me.

“Where do I stand to wait for a StairMaster?”

“Do I need to tip for takeout?”

Turns out most people feel this way.

The other day a woman at Aldi gave me her shopping cart.  If you know the secret-cart- rule at Aldi, you know that to release a grocery cart from the corral, you need to pay a quarter.  Aldi exit-ers simply hand off their carts to Aldi enter-ers in a pay-it-forward kind of way.  First-timers are confused at the dogged insistence of the exit-er to take their cart, until an Aldi old-timer explains the arrangement.

Mentoring is all about explaining the secret-rules.  What knowledge can you share that’ll bring someone a little more into the loop?