The long payoff.

In the beginning, “doing things the right way” seems like a great idea.

In the middle, the slog of putting one foot in front of the other, day after day, feels like a waste of time.  This is the point that short cuts become tempting and people’s determination peters out.

In the end, plodding along in the right direction for years usually pays off big time.

Hint:  This applies to practically everything.

Another hint:  You’ve reached “the big payoff” when you hear yourself saying, “I have no idea how I got this lucky.”

 

Ouch.

It’s amazing how many red flags come back to bite us.

It’s true that our gut is almost always correct, but this intuitive power is useless if we choose to ignore, defend and put our head in the sand.

The key is acting on our hunches before they cause damage.

Surely easier said than done.

 

 

 

The truth.

I have worked with my husband Lou for over two decades.

When there’s a business issue, there’s no posturing, masquerading or blaming.

When something is scary, we don’t have to pretend to be brave.

And when one of us is going down a path that is just plain wrong, the other doesn’t have to coach, cajole, set up a special meeting or converse in PC terms.  We just speak our mind openly to stop the mistake in its tracks.

The truth sure saves a lot of time and energy.

 

 

 

Schooled.

This week I had to learn a new software package at work.

And while I’d describe myself as pretty tech-savvy, I had no idea the concentration it would take for me to learn just a few basic things.  After the first hour on the first day, I was cranky and snippy.

I’ve always romanticized learning.  And what’s most embarrassing is how much this reveals about how little I’ve been stretching myself.

I have to remember this when I put my kids on the bus each morning, and welcome their weary souls back each afternoon.

 

This is Marketing.

Seth’s new book reminded me of something.

Back in the day, my newly minted OB/GYN needed patients.

She hired a manicurist to give manicures to her patients in her waiting room.

In her first year she delivered more babies than doctors that had been practicing for decades.

This is marketing.

Rabbit holes.

I kick myself every time I use my phone’s calculator app.

I only need to multiply 234 and 345, and all of a sudden I’m responding to texts, emails and scrolling recommendations from Netflix.

20-minutes later, I can’t remember why I picked up the phone in the first place.

Everyday.

Most days, I send gratitude group text to my immediate family.   Sometimes one of my sons will reply with something he’s thankful for, but often it’s just me.

This tiny habit helps set my mood to a good one.  And often changes it from a bad one.

Turns out, it’s hard for me to remember my struggles at the same time I’m being grateful.

Happy Thanksgiving everyday.

Managing conflict.

I am a conflict-allergic manager.

But I’ve found another way:  Instead of confronting bad behavior, I compliment good behaviors instead.

Has almost the same outcome in results.

Why wait?

Something that seems out of the blue to the rest of us, has likely been long overdue.

Those who drop out, change careers and skydive may seem brazen and reckless.  But it’s far more likely that they’ve been hesitant and scared to make their move.

This blog is something I’ve been considering for a while.

It sure would’ve been easier to skip the mulling, fear and self-doubt and have done it sooner.