I invented the iPhone.

In 2001, I realized that it was quite cumbersome to carry around my Palm Pilot and camera and push-to-talk flip phone.

What a good idea it would be to combine all my gadgets into one compact appliance!

Lesson learned:  Ideas are cheap without execution.

 

Ouch.

It’s amazing how many red flags come back to bite us.

It’s true that our gut is almost always correct, but this intuitive power is useless if we choose to ignore, defend and put our head in the sand.

The key is acting on our hunches before they cause damage.

Surely easier said than done.

 

 

 

What is normal?

An expert is someone that can explain to you what “normal” is.

Something that is scary or outrageous to a novice, is usually old-hat to an expert.

For example:

A grandma can help a new mom discern between a normal cry and one that suggests illness.

A boss can help their staff understand normal corporate red tape, and shortcuts to circumventing it.

An older brother can help a younger one recognize what normal growing pains feel like, (“Phew, you felt this way too?”).

When I find out that what’s upsetting me is actually “normal,” I usually stop fretting immediately.

Wouldn’t it be great:

-if experts could think back and share their rookie experiences with newbies?

-if we all felt braver about requesting input from people we consider pros, instead of being afraid of seeming inept?

Imagine how much faster we’d all get to where we are going!

 

 

 

 

 

 

Schooled.

This week I had to learn a new software package at work.

And while I’d describe myself as pretty tech-savvy, I had no idea the concentration it would take for me to learn just a few basic things.  After the first hour on the first day, I was cranky and snippy.

I’ve always romanticized learning.  And what’s most embarrassing is how much this reveals about how little I’ve been stretching myself.

I have to remember this when I put my kids on the bus each morning, and welcome their weary souls back each afternoon.