The kids are all right.

This Christmas, I caught up with many of my 20-something relatives.

C & J are newly-married business owners, and already understand how to navigate the potential typhoon of working together.  C is the steady force.  And J takes the risks.

My nephew and his fiancée are doing the hard work of deciding their division of labor before they tie the knot.  Turns out he loves grocery shopping and she doesn’t mind doing laundry.

K aspires to a career in law – and while she’s always been incredibly articulate, she now possesses a strength that will certainly benefit her future Clients.

M is a college freshman and was eager to tell me about his roommate.  R just graduated from college and is making sure he gets a great job before committing to his own place.

I told A some issues I was having at work, and she shared her insights that I’ll put right into practice on Monday.

What can you learn from listening to the young people around you?

Turns out, quite a lot.

 

 

 

Rabbit holes.

I kick myself every time I use my phone’s calculator app.

I only need to multiply 234 and 345, and all of a sudden I’m responding to texts, emails and scrolling recommendations from Netflix.

20-minutes later, I can’t remember why I picked up the phone in the first place.

One extra minute.

The clasp on my watch had a recurring problem:  It would suddenly release at random times.

I took my watch from jeweler to jeweler and everyone had the same answer:  There was nothing wrong with the watch clasp.

At the last store, the jeweler asked if he could examine the way I put the watch on my wrist.

In just 60 seconds of observing me, he realized I was closing the latch from left-to-right, when it should be clasped right-to-left.

Problem solved.

Imagine the chronic issues and pains that might be solved with just one extra minute of attention.