Job security.

When a dreadful project that nobody will touch comes across your desk, snatch it right up.

Dig in deep, untangle the knots and understand every nuance.

Become the person that does this time and time again.

And in no time you’ll be indispensable.

 

 

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The weeds.

“You must be a secretary,” My doctor said as he flipped through my indexed and cross-referenced binder of medical tests.

“No, I just wanted you focused on my issue, instead of having to sift through a disarray of papers and lab work.”

Being strategic often means diving into the details and nuances of a project.

God is in the details.

And the details are in the weeds.

 

Another HT to Seth Godin for getting me to ponder “caring” and “trying” in general.

 

 

 

 

Someone there.

Isn’t it nice when technical support stays on the phone with you longer than they have to? Just to be sure you’ve 100% “got it.”

My husband and I work together, and often when I’m unsure or apprehensive about something I’m working on, he will silently take a seat next to me, often with his arm on my back.

It’s just so comforting to have someone there.

 

Better than before.

The book Better Than Before by Gretchen Rubin is life changing.  After all, that’s all we can ever hope for – to be better than we were yesterday.

This week I struggled for hours with a nonsensical technology problem (I couldn’t get Microsoft Word to download onto my new PC!).

Now that I’ve fixed the problem, I can leverage my newly acquired information throughout my small business, so nobody else wastes their time on the same issue.

What if we looked at all problems as a way to bypass a future struggle?   A way to  become “better than before?”

Stated in this positive way, problems, mistakes and issues would likely become a more welcome part of our days.

 

Initiative.

We all know it’s not your job to replace the lightbulb in the office refrigerator. But imagine becoming known as the “summer intern who changed the bulb?”

Anyone can wait for direction from a supervisor.

What’s in short supply are folks who notice an issue and make it better without being asked.

 

 

Grown up.

Today my 21-year old son called, asking me if I had an old vacuum he could have for his new apartment.

Balloons didn’t drop from the ceiling, but they should have.

 

 

 

My own Finland.

They say Finland is the world’s “happiest place.”

But what I love about owning a business, is that inside our 4 walls I’m able to create my own Finland.

And best of all, you don’t have to own a business to try this yourself:

You can practice this idea first, right in your own family.

Acquiescence.

Acquiescence.

Watching James Holzhauer dominate Jeopardy, is a reminder that the constraints and rules we often accept without question, could be all in our heads.

What rules should you be questioning?

That project in the corner.

Every business has one – a project that needs to be done, but keeps getting postponed.

If you’re a job seeker, think about targeting your dream company and suggesting that you take a stab at that overflowing pile in the corner.

It may just be the hook that finally opens the door.

 

Going beyond.

I walked into the AT&T store today where I hadn’t been for about a year.   Luke, a young salesperson said,  “Hi Paige.”

Last week I left some items at the end of my driveway in case anyone wanted them.  I noticed they were gone and felt happy that they had found a new home.  Two days later I got a thank you note in my mailbox.

I needed tech help with something annoying.  For weeks, my phone would not sync with the mail app on my laptop.   Each time I had 15 minutes to spare I would try to fix the issue, but always came up short.  I tried one more time on Friday and Dan diagnosed my issue in minutes by asking a few incisive questions.

None of these deeds required any extra education, privilege or giftedness.

But I instantly considered these individuals exceedingly educated, accomplished and intelligent.