The sorcerer.

I love to bush-whack a path at work.

This way, when it’s time to delegate a task, I’m clear about how long it will take and the obstacles someone will likely face when completing it. 

Last week I delegated a task and got the following pushback:

“I can’t possibly help on such a huge task right now.” 

Because I had done this same task in the past, I knew it was a quick tweak, not anything that needed coding or technical expertise. 

What I was asking to be done would’ve taken five minutes.

I lost lots of trust during this interaction.

Yes, sometimes things will be demanding and require time, skill, and even sorcery.

But since it’s a cinch to watch a YouTube video or Google some instructions, you can quickly lose credibility by pretending to be the Wizard of Oz.

Pretending to care.

Lots of companies have the word “care” in their mission statements.

But in my experience, the care I get as a customer often feels fake. 

It’s as if companies have a “caring template” and are following an outlined script.

“Welcome to, ABC Company. 

I’m (insert first name). 

How may I provide an exceptional experience for you on this (insert weather) day?”

Contrast this with my experience at Brookline Booksmith:

I entered the humming bookstore, lugging a bin of heavy stuff for an event I was hosting.

“Will anyone here even remember that my event is today?” 

Seeing me struggle with my large bin, a young cashier jumped over the counter to grab it from my arms.

He then walked me to the table Riley had prepared for my arrival – Sharpies, stacks of books to sign, and a table-clothed covered table. There was even water in case I was thirsty (I was!).

Riley greeted me by name and welcomed me to the event – I felt like Julia Roberts!

Because none of this was scripted, it felt so good.  

Riley and the guy who jumped over the counter weren’t pretending to care – they did care.

If the word “care” is in your mission statement, start by hiring people who genuinely take pride in their work.

Out of thin air.

A few months ago, I started doing grocery delivery. Today I got a message saying that I had saved 30 hours this year – a considerable chunk of time.


Add the extra time I’m saving by working out at home instead of the 20 minutes drive each way to the gym.


And then there are the 12 hours I save each month by using TextExpander – a magical piece of software.


With all this extra time, I’ve been working on two books on climate change – one for adults and one for kids.


It’s always satisfying to create something “out of thin air.” But these books were created using the crumbs of newfound time I might’ve Netflixed away if I hadn’t been careful.

Drafts

Want to make sharing your work feel safer?

Add the word “DRAFT” to the top of the page.

Instantly, you’ll feel more secure hurdling your work into the world, where it belongs.

The new “dinner party”

In the 1970s, my parents’ friends gathered each weekend to catch up about life, their kids, and what plumber they were using. 

Today, that same “dinner party” occurs on Google reviews, Facebook, and other online review sites. And while the people aren’t friends in real life, the collective wisdom gives people enough confidence to call the plumber that’s getting lots of thumbs up.

It’s super-important that someone in your business is in charge of managing the online review process.

First things first:

Most importantly, spend time making sure your business is consistently creating happy customers.

If customers aren’t consistently happy, spend your time fixing your business. Full stop. 

Good service = the best marketing because it will generate repeat and word-of-mouth business. And you also won’t have to find new customers to constantly replace your unhappy ones.

Once you’ve got happy customers, put someone in charge of online reviews:

I use 5 Star Business because it makes it easier for my customers to leave a review. Since the software on 5 Star Business “senses” what platform a customer is already signed into, there’s less chance of a customer abandoning the process because they forgot their Facebook password.

Any way you do it, reach out to all of your customers and ask them if they’ll do you a favor and post an online review.

Once you get a review, respond to it

If you go here you can see my exact responses to Google reviews, but here’s my response “structure:”

  1. Express “joy and appreciation” for good reviews, “This review made my day!”
  2. Express “concern and appreciation” for the feedback on bad reviews, “This is so helpful for me so I will address it with my whole company at the next Team Meeting…”
  3. Point out something specific about their experience with your company: “I saw photos of the mahogany deck that Jay stained, it looks fabulous.”
  4. Mention the person at the company that made them happy – this shows that I’m not an absentee owner.

Why generate online reviews?

  • Your competition is already generating reviews, and it’ll be hard to “catch up” to a competitor with tons in a few years.
  • At some point, someone is going to leave a bad review online. This is normal and expected. Having lots of good online reviews and great responses to reviews helps to “water down” the occasional bad review. 

Be patient!

I aim to generate just two online reviews a month.  Please re-read that sentence and set your expectations low. This is not a sprint, but a marathon.

Understand, it’s much better to consistently get reviews than to get them in fits and starts.

Don’t:

Gather at the holidays and get your relatives to post tons of reviews in one week. Not only are fake reviews against the rules, putting tons of reviews up at one time is a signal that they’re fake. 

Thanks for reading and if you have any questions, leave them in the comments.

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